And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.—Exodus 21.16.

[Fair Treatment for Sodomites.]

FAIR TREATMENT
FOR SODOMITES:
An Act of Parliament
During the Reign of
His Most Excellent Majesty
KING EDWARD VI.
Of England.

And Asa did that which was right in the eyes of the LORD, as did David his father.
And he took away the sodomites out of the land.
.—1 Kings 15.11-12.
And the remnant of the sodomites, which remained in the days of his father Asa,
he [Jehoshaphat] took out of the land.
.—1 Kings 22.45.
And he brake down the houses of the sodomites, that were by the house of the LORD,
where the women wove hangings for the grove.
.—2 Kings 23.7.
... They which commit such things are worthy of death.....—Romans 1.

TrueCovenanter.com Editor’s Introduction:

Fair Treatment! And what might that be? The phrase Fair Treatment may take on many meanings as it is used in the ordinary conversation of men, as well as when it is bandied about by cunning politicians and the mindless lackeys responsible for reporting the “News.” But one most useful meaning of the phrase is Treatment that one Deserves, or Treatment that one is entitled unto by a special right or common equity. How then does the following law especially exhibit Fair Treatment for Sodomites? According to Divine Appointment Sodomites deserve death for their abominable crime: If a man also lie with mankind, as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination: they shall surely be put to death; their blood shall be upon them.—Leviticus 20.13. This being so, the Parliament of England, during the reigns of that nation’s first three Protestant Monarchs, passed laws appointing the pain of death to be executed as the sufficient and condign punishment for the detestable vice of buggery. However, there is something peculiarly fair about the Act of Parliament appointed during the reign of King Edward VI. Whereas the law during the days of Henry VIII, before the time of King Edward VI, and the law during the days of Elizabeth I (and afterwards), after the time of King Edward VI, appointed additionally the forfeiting of goods, lands, and hereditaments, to the great disadvantage of the offenders’ heirs; the law enacted during the days of Edward VI takes on a more charitable and Christian form, by making provision for such persons who otherwise might greatly suffer on account of a single deed for which they themselves are no ways responsible.

Perhaps the favourable publication of this Act of Parliament will be displeasing to a great many individuals who have been thoroughly brain-washed by the (im)-morals of modern society, yet, this only makes the publication thereof more useful and necessary. Perhaps also the deluded & inventive imaginations of some will even deem the publication hereof to be a “crime” not worthy to be tolerated with the unspeakable filthiness that is done by perverts behind closed doors. But the present editor is not responsible for what follows. The law below was enacted during the reign of the most honourable Monarch ever to reign over England, who by consent of all that were not blinded by Papist malice (and even some who were), was of an extraordinary godliness and wisdom which surpassed that of all English Monarchs who went before him, (and we suppose after him as well.) Though he was a youth, yet he was wiser than the blinded ancients of our day, for he and those who assisted him in the government of that nation knew that, if the Spirit of God speaking by the Apostle Paul (in his epistle to the Romans, chapter 1,) condemned both Sodomites and those who have pleasure in them, by countenancing and defending their crimes, then there was no law on earth that could justify either such crimes, or their own criminal countenancing thereof. Let all then take heed, for verily he is a God that judgeth in the earth.—Psalm 58.11.


ANNO SECVNDO
ET TERTIO EDOVARDI
SEXTI.
¶ACTES

made in the Session of this
present parliament, holden vpon pro-
rogacion at Westminster the fourth
daie of Nouember, in the second yere
of oure most drad souereigne Lorde
Edward the VI. by the grace of God
King of England, France, and Ire-

lande, defendor of the faith, and of the
churche of England and also of Ire-
land, in yearth the supreme hed:
and there continued & kept
to the xiiii daie of Mar-
che, in the .iii. yere of
oure saied soue-
reigne lorde,
as folo-
weth.

ANNO SECUNDO
ET TERTIO EDOVARDI
SEXTI.
¶ACTS

made in the Session of this
present parliament, holden upon pro-
rogation at Westminster the fourth
day of November, in the second year
of our most dread sovereign Lord
Edward the VI. by the grace of God
King of England, France, and Ire-

land, defender of the faith, and of the
church of England and also of Ire-
land, in earth the supreme head:
and there continued & kept
to the 14th day of Mar-
ch, in the 3rd year of
our said sove-
reign lord,
as follo-
weth.

29. ¶ The .xxix. Chapiter.
¶ An Acte agaynst Sodomy.

(29)

29. ¶ The .xxix. Chapter.
¶ An Act against Sodomy.

FOR asmuche as there is not at thys presente tyme any sufficient and condigne punishement appoynted by due course of the lawes of thys Realme, for the detestable vyce of Buggorie[1]: Be it therfore enacted by the assente of the Kynges hyghnes, the Lordes Spirituall and temporal and the Commons in this presente Parliament assembled, that all and euerie offendour or offendours in that cryme, after the fyrst daye of Aprill nexte ensuyng, beyng thereof conuicted, or attaynted by verdicte, confessyon, outlarye, or otherwise, shal suffer such paynes of death, without loss of goods or landes, or any other cómodite, his only life excepted, as felons cóuicted or attainted of felonie ben accustomed to do, touching thesayed paynes of deathe, by the Common lawes of thys Realme: And that no suche person shall enioye the priuelege or benefyte of hys or theyr Clergie or Sanctuary: And that the Justices of Peace shall haue full power and aucthoritie, wythin the lymytes of theyr Commission, and Jurisdictions, to here and determine thesayd offence, touchyng thesayd paynes of death, as they doo, and haue used to doo in cases of Felonie: Sauyng to the wyfe and chyldren the heyres and successours, & administratours of thesayd offendour or offendours, and all other persones, and bodyes politique, other then thesayed offendour or offendours, all such ryght, tytle, clayme, and interest, to al & euery thesayd offendour, or offendours, goodes, landes, and hereditamentes, as they, or any of thé myght haue, or ought to haue had, yf the said offendor or offendors had died his or theyr natural death, or had neyther in this case, neyther by any other meane offended any of the Kynges lawes.

Forasmuch as there is not at this present time any sufficient and condign punishment appointed by due course of the laws of this Realm, for the detestable vice of Buggery[2]: Be it therefore enacted by the assent of the King’s highness, the Lords Spiritual and temporal, and the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, that all and every offender or offenders in that crime, after the first day of April next ensuing, being thereof convicted, or attainted by verdict, confession, outlawry, or otherwise, shall suffer such pains of death, without loss of goods or lands, or any other commodity, his only life excepted, as felons convicted or attainted of felony [have] been accustomed to do, touching the said pains of death, by the Common laws of this Realm: And that no such person shall enjoy the privilege or benefit of his or their Clergy or Sanctuary: And that the Justices of Peace shall have full power and authority, within the limits of their Commission, and Jurisdictions, to hear and determine the said offence, touching the said pains of death, as they do, and have used to do in cases of Felony: Saving to the wife and children the heirs and successours, & administrators of the said offender or offenders, and all other persons, and bodies politick, other than the said offender or offenders, all such right, title, claim, and interest, to all & every the said offender, or offenders, goods, lands, and hereditaments, as they, or any of them might have, or ought to have had, if the said offender or offenders had died his or their natural death, or had neither in this case, neither by any other mean offended any of the King’s laws.

PROVIDED that no maner of person bee empeched or molested for thesayed offence by reason of thys presente Acte, excepte the sayed person bee endicted of thesayed offence wythin syxe Monethes nexte and immediatlie folowyng the tyme of commyttyng of the same. And that no person bee receyued for wytnes, or to laye or geue euidence agaynst thesayed offendour, as vpon whose credite the enquest shoulde enfourme them selfe, whyche person shoulde take any profite or commoditie by the deathe of thesayed offendour, yf he were attaynted or conuicted of thesayed cryme and offence: Nor that any suche attayndour shall make any corrupcion of bloude to the heyre or heyres of suche offendour or offendours.

PROVIDED that no manner of person be impeached or molested for the said offence by reason of this present Act, except the said person be indicted of the said offence within six Months next and immediately following the time of committing of the same. And that no person be received for witness, or to lay or give evidence against the said offender, as upon whose credit the inquest should inform himself, which person should take any profit or commodity by the death of the said offender, if he were attainted or convicted of the said crime and offence: Nor that any such attainder shall make any corruption of blood to the heir or heirs of such offender or offenders.


1. The following sites contain relevant information about the history of laws against Sodomy in England and in America:

2. The following sites contain relevant information about the history of laws against Sodomy in England and in America:

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/pwh/englaw.html

http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/pwh/englaw.html

http://www.citizensoldier.org/deathofamerica.html

http://www.citizensoldier.org/deathofamerica.html